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20120922
20120922
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
. that is protected in the united states by the first amendment. they just do not have the power to change any of that. the fact that, you know, the secretary of state in the united states saying this film is bad and reprehensible and disgusting -- that is an expression of her opinion. it is not a promise to introduce legislation to curb that. they should listen to the prime minister of turkey, the president of egypt, you know, the pakastani is. all these muslim countries. what they are really seeking is an amendment of the first amendment, and that just is not going to happen. >> should there not the laws against inciting, as it were, religious hatred? there are such laws in some countries -- the united kingdom. presumably those are lots you think should exist, no? >> i do not think that such laws should exist. if you look at the history of the freedom of speech, the freedom of conscience, the freedom of expression in europe and america, this is the culmination of the victory of the individual. it has become one of the most basic human rights. this was not achieved overnight. hundreds of years went b
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
for the united states. >> allowing our own congress to check our moves. >> i'm not going to play ken rogoff in chess. ken is exactly right. this is actually washington. this is the nature of our political system. they always put off the tough decisions till the last minute. a little point of optimism. this week, the house senate, democrats and republicans, had a hearing on what to do about this tax system that ken and i have so much about that's an abomination, that's an albatross around the neck of the politicians. they said, next year, we've got to do this. and i think 2013 -- hold me to this promise -- i think next year, they do something really big on fixing the tax system. they have to deal with the amt, the estate tax, the tax cliff that's coming, all these things come to a fore in 2013. gets to the point, when will they fix it? when they're right up against the abyss? >> i think if there's a fairly decisive election result, the democrats win across the board or the republicans win across the board, yes. i'm not so sure. i'm just not so sure what they're going to do if we get stuck in
their hatred of the united states. protesters burned american flags and vented their anger at western nations. saddam is, banks, and cars were torched -- cinemas, banks, and cars were torched. the day of love turned to a day of rage. police used shipping containers to block the entrance to the u.s. embassy, but demonstrators still try to force their way in. they engaged officers in street battles and were met with batons and tear gas. pakistan's prime minister pleaded for calm earlier in the day but also expressed his understanding of the motives of the demonstrators. >> [inaudible] on the whole belief of 1.5 billion muslims. therefore, this is something that is unacceptable. >> ashraf called it the duty of a muslim to protest, but critics say he did not do enough to counter the violent message of islamist groups. yes to protest, no to violence -- if that was the message, it did not resonate. angry young men fought with police in islamabad's diplomatic district, where a number of western embassies are located. it took hours for the police to restore order. >> let's go live now to pakistan. th
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)